credential


credential
credential, testimonial, recommendation, character, reference mean something presented by one person to another in proof that he is what or who he claims to be.
Credential (usually in the plural credentials) implies material evidence and especially a letter or document indicating that a person (occasionally a thing) is what he claims (or it seems) to be; the term was originally and is still used of the letter from the sovereign or head of one state to another carried by a new envoy or ambassador and formally presented to the sovereign or head of the state in which he is to serve
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an envoy extraordinary from Savoy . . . presented his credentials in the Banqueting House— Macaulay

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The term is often used of a letter presented to show competency or to attest identity, or of statements made or acts performed that serve as proof of what is to follow
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if we turn out to be poor managers of our own affairs, we will have inferior credentials to present abroad—W. O. Douglas

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the putative Professor Moriarty of the fight business, who may or may not die of old age before his credentials as an archfiend are established— Lardner

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these statements I put forward by way of credentials for a comparison which I purpose to make— Grandgent

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Testimonial usually implies a written statement from a person competent to judge the character, qualifications, or merits of another and to testify to his fitness to hold or to fill an office or a position
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six testimonials were received affirming his fitness for the ministry

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selected what seemed to me from the testimonials to be the two best men— Crofts

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However, the word is often used as an equivalent of recommendation, a term which implies that the statement comes from one (as a former employer or teacher) who commends a person to the notice of a possible employer
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armed with several recommendations he started out to seek a job

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Character, which in this sense is used chiefly in Great Britain, is the designation given to a statement furnished by a former employer about the qualities and habits of a person as manifested while in his employ
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then came . . . the coachman, the grooms, the sweeper. For each and all of these I had to write charactersJohn Lang

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Although reference may imply no more than the giving of the name of a person from whom information regarding another may be obtained (as by a possible employer or landlord) it increasingly tends to be employed as a synonym of recommendation or character
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Mrs. Blank told the woman she would let her know when she had examined her references

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she had lost all her references and was afraid to apply for a job

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Analogous words: certification, accreditation, endorsement, sanction (see corresponding verbs at APPROVE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Credential — Cre*den tial (kr[ e]*d[e^]n shal), a. [Cf. It. credenziale, fr. LL. credentia. See {Credence}.] Giving a title or claim to credit or confidence; accrediting. [1913 Webster] Their credential letters on both sides. Camden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Credential — Cre*den tial, n. [Cf. It. credenziale.] 1. That which gives a title to credit or confidence. [1913 Webster] 2. pl. Testimonials showing that a person is entitled to credit, or has right to exercise official power, as the letters given by a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • credential — index believable, certification (certification of proficiency), recommendation Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • credential — that which entitles to credit, late 15c. (adj.), from M.L. credentialis, from credentia (see CREDENCE (Cf. credence)). As a noun, attested from 1756. Related: Credentialled …   Etymology dictionary

  • credential — ► NOUN 1) a qualification, achievement, etc., that gives an indication of a person s suitability for something. 2) a document or certificate proving a person s identity or qualifications. 3) a letter of introduction given by a government to an… …   English terms dictionary

  • credential — [kri den′shəl] adj. [ME credencial < ML credentialis: see CREDENCE] Rare entitling to credit, confidence, etc.; accrediting n. [usually pl.] 1. anything giving evidence that someone is entitled to or deserving of credit, confidence, etc. 2. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Credential — For the record label, see Credential Recordings. A credential is an attestation of qualification, competence, or authority issued to an individual by a third party with a relevant or de facto authority or assumed competence to do so. Examples of… …   Wikipedia

  • credential — I. adjective Date: 15th century warranting credit or confidence used chiefly in the phrase credential letters II. noun Date: 1655 1. something that gives a title to credit or confidence; also qualification 3a 2. plural testimonials or certified… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Credential — Ein Berechtigungsnachweis (engl. credential) ist ein Instrumentarium, das einem System die Identität eines anderen Systems oder eines Benutzers bestätigen soll. Dies geschieht meist in Form einer Benutzerkennung in Verbindung mit einem… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • credential — /kri den sheuhl/, n. 1. Usually, credentials. 2. evidence of authority, status, rights, entitlement to privileges, or the like, usually in written form: Only those with the proper credentials are admitted. 3. anything that provides the basis for… …   Universalium


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